Ansel Adams: Masterworks, Edward Burtynsky: The Landscape That We Change


Edward Burtynsky, Mines #17, 86x104 cm, Lornex Open Pit Copper Mine, Highland Valley, British Columbia 1985 © Edward Burtynsky, courtesy Nicholas Metivier, Toronto Edward Burtynsky, Oil Spill #4, 86x104 cm, Oil Skimming Boat, Near Ground Zero, Gulf of Mexico, June 24, 2010 © Edward Burtynsky, courtesy Nicholas Metivier, Toronto Edward Burtynsky, Burning Tire Pile # 1, 99x124 cm, Near Stockton, California, 1999 © Edward Burtynsky, courtesy Nicholas Metivier, Toronto

Edward Burtynsky, Mines #17, 86x104 cm,
Lornex Open Pit Copper Mine, Highland Valley, British Columbia 1985 © Edward Burtynsky, courtesy Nicholas Metivier, Toronto

Edward Burtynsky, Oil Spill #4, 86x104 cm, Oil Skimming Boat, Near Ground Zero, Gulf of Mexico, June 24, 2010 © Edward Burtynsky, courtesy Nicholas Metivier, Toronto

Edward Burtynsky, Burning Tire Pile # 1, 99x124 cm, Near Stockton, California, 1999 © Edward Burtynsky, courtesy Nicholas Metivier, Toronto


Edward Burtynsky: The Landscape That We Change

Held over until October 14!

Due to the tremendous success of Edward Burtynsky: The Landscape That We Change, the exhibition has been extended until October 14, 2013. Burtynsky's large-scale photographs of disrupted landscapes, rich in colour and detail, have been captivating audiences since the show opened on June 29, 2013. See these "new landscapes of our time" up close.

 

Organized by the McMichael Canadian Art Collection and curated by Chris Finn

 

Edward Burtynsky: The Landscape That We Change is comprised of a selection of thirty photographic images from several series including landscape works from the early 1980s to more recent images chosen from his Mining photographs, as well as Railcuts, Homesteads, Tailings, Oil, and others. Burtynsky’s photographs present the “disrupted” landscapes; those created by the technology used in the extraction of minerals and energy from the planet, and those changed by the need for extensive delivery systems put in place to move materials for production of goods. Several photographs representing the end of life of the manufactured consumer products as expended materials are also included. 

The artist’s vision of photographing these “new landscapes of our time” continues to be realized through his decades-long examination of the environments that humans have changed, not only in Canada but also the United States, Asia, and other countries that have directly or indirectly experienced the impact of the exponential growth of consumer culture.

Burtynsky does not seek to position his images into the realm of political polemic. The artist has stated that they “are what they are.” His photographs engage the observer through what the artist refers to as a “duality” in the viewing process. In Burtynsky’s aesthetic interpretation, his images render the subject most often in rich colour, detail, and textural qualities. Simultaneously, the observer is made aware of the devastation and altered state of nature that is portrayed. The tension generated by mediating the dual nature of the individual’s response to the image is intended to provoke a thoughtful dialogue about the environment and societal attitudes.


To see more of Edward Burtynsky's work, visit EdwardBurtynsky.com.


Edward Burtynsky, Homesteads #30, 122x147 cm, West of Merritt, British Columbia © Edward Burtynsky, courtesy Nicholas Metivier, Toronto Edward Burtynsky, Landscape Study #2, 122x122 cm, Ontario, 1981 © Edward Burtynsky, courtesy Nicholas Metivier, Toronto

Edward Burtynsky, Homesteads #30, 122x147 cm, West of Merritt, British Columbia © Edward Burtynsky, courtesy Nicholas Metivier, Toronto

Edward Burtynsky: The Landscape That We Change - August 24, 2013 - McMichael Canadian Art Collection

Edward Burtynsky, Landscape Study #2, 122x122 cm, Ontario, 1981 © Edward Burtynsky, courtesy Nicholas Metivier, Toronto

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